August And Solar Heat Gain

One of the best parts about getting outside during the summer is the warm sunshine. We wait impatiently through the winter for those days when we can sit on the beach and feel the sun on our skin. We countdown the days to the warm, vowing to never complain about the heat when summer finally does arrive, then it’s here and we’re reminded how much the hot summer sun can heat up our houses too.

Aug 14, 2014

One of the best parts about getting outside during the summer is the warm sunshine. We wait impatiently through the winter for those days when we can sit on the beach and feel the sun on our skin. We countdown the days to the warm, vowing to never complain about the heat when summer finally does arrive, then it’s here and we’re reminded how much the hot summer sun can heat up our houses too.

The soaring temperatures in your home are not only driven by the temperature outside, but also by solar heat gain, which is a spike in temperature caused by the amount of solar radiation that comes through your windows and walls. If you’ve ever walked in your home and wondered how it can be so much hotter inside than it is outside, that is usually caused by solar heat gain.

While we appreciate those heating rays coming in during the cooler months, in the summer it can cause not only a spike in the temperature inside your home, but also in your energy bill. Solar heat gain can make it that much harder and that much more expensive to cool your home.

There are some things you can do to try to save money on energy and help keep your home cooler in the summer months without having to crank up the AC. Curtains and blinds are two of the simplest ways to keep out some of the heat. These options give you the flexibility to let the sun in when you want to and to keep it out when you don’t. Something to keep in mind when you’re choosing your curtains is the amount of solar heat gain they keep out can be influenced by the color and the material they’re made out of. Outside of your home you can plant trees to provide shade or install awnings. If you choose to install awnings, try to choose ones that are retractable so you can let the sunlight in when you want to.

The best way to combat solar heat gain in the warm summer months is to install some type of window covering to control how much the sun can heat up your interior. Window coverings will also give you flexibility year-round to control daylighting as well as heat flow in the colder months.

The best option for keeping solar heat gain out in those scorching summer months is to install energy efficient windows. New windows can greatly reduce the amount of heat getting in by creating a better barrier from the heat. Another added benefit to new windows that are more energy efficient is they can also keep the cold out when the temps start to drop. There are so many energy efficient options out there now from laminated glass, to triple pane, and they can all save you a lot of money on your energy bill year round. In addition to savings on your heating and cooling costs, new windows can also minimize the fading of your carpets and furniture and reduce exterior noise. Contact a professional today for a quote and start dreaming about how you’ll spend all those heating and cooling savings.

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